Lemon Honey Chamomile Pudding

Have I ever mentioned that I am a bit of a Grandma? Actually, forget that, I’m a total Grandma at heart. I knit, I read books that were written at least 100 years before I was born (I decided to tackle Tolstoy; both Anna Karenina and War and Peace, just to say that I did it) and I go to bed at like 8 PM. Well that was the old me, I’m getting better, it’s closer to 9 now 😉

Also, I love lemon pudding. And chamomile tea with lots of honey. So as I was craving lemon pudding today, I thought, “why not make lemon, honey, chamomile pudding?”

That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. You should make this pudding. Especially if your grandma is coming for dinner. Or if you feel like channeling your inner Grandma. Or if you just want some pudding, that works too.

Lemon Honey Chamomile Pudding

honey chamomile pudding

Yield: 4-6 servings (I made leftovers for snackies!)

Ingredients:

– 2 cups water
– 1 tbsp. chamomile tea leaves (or 1-2 tea bags)
– 1/4 to 1/3 cup white sugar
– 1/4 to 1/3 cup honey
– juice of 2 lemons
– 1/4 cup cornstarch
– 1/4 cup cold water
– fresh or frozen raspberries (or other fruit of your choice) – optional

Combine the water, tea, sugar, honey and lemon juice in a saucepan. I always start with the lesser amounts of sugar/honey and taste to make sure it is sweet enough for me. Whisk to combine and bring the mixture to a boil. If you are using tea bags instead of leaves, I would recommend removing them now, before you add the cornstarch so it doesn’t turn into a gloopy mess.
Meanwhile mix the cornstarch and cold water together, forming a slurry. Once the cornstarch is dissolved, whisk the slurry into the boiling lemon/honey/chamomile water. Whisk constantly until the mixture thickens (this should occur instantly assuming it’s at a rolling boil). Cook for 1-2 minutes to get rid of the pasty cornstarch taste. Appealing, right?

honey chamomile pudding

Now all you have to do is pour the pudding into your desired serving vessel (s). I put some frozen raspberries on the bottom of my ramekins first just for kicks. Because I used tea leaves (David’s Tea Dolce and Banana, to be exact) I half-heartedly strained the pudding using the only kitchen equipment that would (sort of) do the job, a colander. A few leaves remained but at least it got rid of the big bites of chamomile flowers. In a perfect world all kitchens could come equipped with chinois and fine mesh sieves. But in the world of a self-titled “starving student”, they don’t. Instead we strain our pudding in the same thing we strain our pasta. Whatever works, I’m telling you.

honey chamomile pudding

Anyways after you are finished with the straining method of your choice (this could even include not straining at all), it’s refrigeration time. Directly cover the surface of each pudding with plastic wrap if you want to avoid forming a skin. If you are assuming that I boycotted this stage too, 3 gold stars for you. Come on! This is the girl who strained her pudding with a colander, you expect me to care about a measly old pudding skin?   After they have chilled, they are ready for your consumption. I would highly recommend sprinkling sugar on top and blow-torching them, similar to creme brulee. You know, add a little crunch. But, my lack of a blow torch meant that I missed out on this too 🙁 Oh well, the pudding itself was pretty decent. Decent enough to satisfy Grandma over here.

honey chamomile pudding

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *